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Author Topic: Dealing with dialogue  (Read 8520 times)

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superpsycho

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Dealing with dialogue
« on: 11/09-12:34 »

When writing dialogue, imagining you're each character helps to develop realistic sentences but remember you're not really duplicating how people actually talk since you want to leave out the boring parts, characters speaking over each other, saying "ah" "um" and "er" a lot, and jumping from one topic to another without any warning.

It's also best to avoid trying to put out a lot of information in dialogue all at once, which can make it dry.

The main thing is providing enough information to establish the context of the scene surrounding the dialogue in the way of action, thought or emotion. It doesn't have to be a lot, just enough to give some depth and authenticity to the scene, and is pertinent to the story, plot or subplot.

In a novel, the reader can't see the character's actions or emotions. If an author tries to describe every little item of a scene they have in their head as if it was a movie image, then they'll more than likely end up overwhelming the story. A writer is better off providing just enough information to give a sense of what's happening without going overboard.

Version one:

"You know you're an idiot," said John.

"You think so?"

"Oh course I do or I wouldn't have just said so."

"Maybe, you're right," Max said. "So you think I should tell her?"

"Definitely, and the sooner the better."

"Okay, I will."

John Looked down at his friend and wondered if he was all right.

Version two:

"You know you're an idiot," John mumbled, the slurring of his words getting worse with each glass of brandy.

Max looked at him with blood shot eyes he was finding difficult to keep open, "You think so?"

"Oh course I do or I wouldn't have just said so," his best friend replied with an indignant stare, as he refilled Max's glass.

"Maayybe, you're right," Max got out as his head dropped in resignation, then jerked up to look at John with one eye closed. "Sooo... you think I should tell her?"

"Def—hic—initely... and the sooner the better."

"Okaaay... I will," Max promised as he passed out and slid to the floor.

John Looked down at his friend and wondered if he was all right.


Links:
Tips for Writing Dialogue in Fiction
Writing Dialogue
9 Rules For Writing Dialogue

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